Mechanics of work

July 8, 2014 § Leave a comment

The start of a reading list, looking at work, bodies, industry, machines and machination/mechanical process,particularly in primary industries. If you have any suggestions – please leave a comment.

  • The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature from Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature – William Cronon
  • The perception of the environment. Essays on livelihood, dwelling and skill – Tim Ingold
  • Work and the Body in Hardy and Other Nineteenth-Century Novelists – Elaine Scarry
  • Some moral and technical consequences of automation – Norbert Wiener
  • The Human use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society – Norbert Wiener
  • Industrial work and life. An anthropological reader – Mao Mollona
  • Humans, Animals, Machines Blurring Boundaries – Glen A. Mazis
  • Copying Machines: Taking Notes for the Automaton – Catherine Liu
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Books for lyrical journeys of pilgrimage in landscape, the sea and ice and the true north. A list in progress.

January 14, 2013 § Leave a comment

ARCTIC CIRCLE / TRUE NORTH

Winter Count – Barry Lopez
The Last Imaginary Place: A Human History of the Arctic World – Robert McGhee
The Island Within – Richard Nelson
The Norton Book of Nature Writing – ed. John Elder and Robert Finch
This Cold Heaven: Seven Seasons in Greenland – Gretel Ehrlich
A Woman in the Polar Night – Christiane Ritter
Sea Ice: An Introduction to its Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology – David N. Thomas
The Magnetic North: Notes From the Arctic Circle – Sara Wheeler
True North: Travels in Arctic Europe – Gavin Francis
Iceland Imagined: Nature, Culture, and Storytelling in the North Atlantic – Karen Oslund
The Arctic: An Anthology – Elizabeth Kolbert
The Ice Museum: In Search of the Lost Land of Thule – Joanna Kavenna

OCEANS / SEAS / TIDELANDS / RIVERS / ISLANDS

Atlantic: A Vast Ocean of a Million Stories: The Biography of an Ocean – Simon Winchester
Hard Water – Jean Sprackland
Plainwater – Anne Carson
The Last Great Sea: A voyage through the human and natural history of the north pacific ocean – Terry Glavin
Passage To Juneau: A Sea and Its Meaning – Jonathan Raban
Islands: A trip through time and space – Peter Conrad

WANDERING / WALKING / PILGRIMAGE / LABYRINTH

The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot – Robert Macfarlane
Sightlines – Kathleen Jamie
Nightwalk: A journey to the heart of nature – Chris Yates
To the River – Olivia Laing
Names for the Sea: Strangers in Iceland – Sarah Moss
A Field Guide to Getting Lost – Rebecca Solnit
Mazes and Labyrinths – W.H. Starr Matthews
The Labyrinth: Symbol of Fear, Rebirth and Liberation – Helmut Jaskolski

LANGUAGE / MAPS / INDEXES / VIGNETTES

Shallow Water Dictionary – John Stilgoe
Hard Water – Jean Sprackland
The Poetics of Space – Gaston Bachelard
Atlas of Remote Islands – Judith Schalansky
On Being Blue: a Philosophical Inquiry (colour blue) – William H. Gass
You are Here: Personal Geographies and Other Maps of the Imagination – Katharine Harmon
From Here to There: A Curious Collection from the Hand Drawn Map Association – Kris Harzinski
Everything Sings. Maps for a Narrative Atlas – Denis Wood
The Dictionary of Imaginary Places – A. Manguel
A Dictionary of Northern Mythology – Rudolf Simek

Suggestions welcome

What is the obstacle? What is the warning?

January 14, 2013 § Leave a comment

1. I don’t know if I can imagine three months alone in a strange land, carting sand from one end to the other. Shuffling a pathway (pilgrimage) through the snow, casting it, and then recreating it, that journey, that path, for others to follow. A map which can be laid on any floor. A portable hole.

2. Standing at the edge. I was at Bondi Beach in Sydney once and I walked out into the waves when I felt the sea floor below me give way and plunge into the beginning of the great deep. No more solid land to make you feel safe, land that can be walked back to shore, back across the sand, back across the road and then as far as you need to go before you reach home.

3. In a strange car at night on an unfamiliar road the kind where the bitumen rounds off on to grass, rocks and then trees. No houses about, headlights. A black cat crosses the highway and someone else in the car says ‘was that a cat’ and you say ‘yes’.

4. Hiding places. For physical things, for thoughts, for secrets.

5. A stream that is small enough to cross. A river that is too big.

6. The creek was cool and running fast. We laid our drinks and milk in the creek to cool them down. Further up the creek the water rushes over a crevice of rocks and you can shimmy up them, sit and wedge yourself in and the water flows over the rock to your lap.

7. A stranger who opens your window. Noises outside.

8. 25840 tonne icebreaker forging a path through sheer brute force. The sea flows where it shouldn’t. But we made it through.

EXPLANATION OF SEA TERMS USED IN ICY SEAS

January 14, 2013 § Leave a comment

A Voyage of Discovery, 1819

Made under the orders of the Admiralty, in, His Majesty’s Ships, Isabella and Alexander, for the purpose of exploring Baffin’s Bay and inquiring into the probability of NORTH-WEST PASSAGE.

By John Ross, K.S. Captain Royal Navy

——-

EXPLANATION OF SEA TERMS

USED IN ICY SEAS

——-

Iceberg, an insulated mountain of ice.

A Floe, a piece of ice of a considerable size, but the extent of which can be distinguished.

A Patch, a number of pieces of ice overlapping and joining each other.

A Stream, a number of pieces of ice joining each other in a ridge on any particular direction.

Loose Ice, a number of pieces near each other, but through which the ship can make way.

Sailing Ice, a number of pieces at a distance, sufficient for a ship to be able to beat a windward among it.

Brash Ice, ice in a broken state, and in such small pieces, that the ship can easily force through.

Cake Ice, ice formed in the early part of the same season.

Bay Ice, newly-formed ice, having the colour of the water.

Hummocks of Ice, humps of ice thrown up by some pressure, or force, on a field or floe.

Heavy Ice, that which has a great depth in proportion, and is not in a state of decay.

A Lane, or Vein, a narrow channel between two floes or fields.

Beset, surrounded with ice, so as to be obliged to remain immovable.

Nipt, caught and jammed between two pieces of ice.

A Tongue, a piece projecting from the part of an iceberg which is under water.

A Calf, a piece of ice which breaks from the lower part of a field or berg, and rises with violence to the surface of the water.

A Barrier, ice stretching from the land ice to the sea ice, or across a channel, so as to be impassable.

Land Ice, ice attached to the shore within which there is no channel.

Sea Ice, ice within which there is a separation from the land.

Download the book. Warning for colonial descriptions of First Nations people.

198 METHODS OF NONVIOLENT ACTION – Gene Sharp

January 14, 2013 § 1 Comment

THE METHODS OF NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION

FORMAL STATEMENTS

1. Public speeches

2. Letters of opposition or support

3. Declarations by organizations and institutions

4. Signed public declarations

5. Declarations of indictment and intention

6. Group or mass petitions

COMMUNICATIONS WITH A WIDER AUDIENCE

7. Slogans, caricatures, and symbols

8. Banners, posters, and displayed communications

9. Leaflets, pamphlets, and books

10. Newspapers and journals

11. Records, radio, and television

12. Skywriting and earthwriting

GROUP REPRESENTATIONS

13. Deputations

14. Mock awards

15. Group lobbying

16. Picketing

17. Mock elections

SYMBOLIC PUBLIC ACTS

18. Displays of flags and symbolic colours

19. Wearing of symbols

20. Prayer and worship

21. Delivering symbolic objects

22. Protest disrobings

23. Destruction of own property

24. Symbolic lights

25. Displays of portraits

26. Paint as protest

27. New signs and names

28. Symbolic sounds

29. Symbolic reclamations

30. Rude gestures

PRESSURES ON INDIVIDUALS

31. “Haunting” officials

32. Taunting officials

33. Fraternization

34. Vigils

DRAMA AND MUSIC

35. Humourous skits and pranks

36. Performances of plays and music

37. Singing

PROCESSIONS

38. Marches

39. Parades

40. Religious processions

41. Pilgrimages

42. Motorcades

HONOURING THE DEAD

43. Political mourning

44. Mock funerals

45. Demonstrative funerals

46. Homage at burial places

PUBLIC ASSEMBLIES

47. Assemblies of protest or support

48. Protest meetings

49. Camouflaged meetings of protest

50. Teach-ins

WITHDRAWAL AND RENUNCIATION

51. Walk-outs

52. Silence

53. Renouncing honours

54. Turning one’s back

THE METHODS OF SOCIAL NONCOOPERATION

OSTRACISM OF PERSONS

55. Social boycott

56. Selective social boycott

57. Lysistratic nonaction

58. Excommunication

59. Interdict

NONCOOPERATION WITH SOCIAL EVENTS, CUSTOMS,

AND INSTITUTIONS

60. Suspension of social and sports activities

61. Boycott of social affairs

62. Student strike

63. Social disobedience

64. Withdrawal from social institutions

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE SOCIAL SYSTEM

65. Stay-at-home

66. Total personal noncooperation

67. “Flight” of workers

68. Sanctuary

69. Collective disappearance

70. Protest emigration (hijrat)

THE METHODS OF ECONOMIC NONCOOPERATION:

ECONOMIC BOYCOTTS

ACTION BY CONSUMERS

71. Consumers’ boycott

72. Nonconsumption of boycotted goods

73. Policy of austerity

74. Rent withholding

75. Refusal to rent

76. National consumers’ boycott

77. International consumers’ boycott

ACTION BY WORKERS AND PRODUCERS

78. Workers’ boycott

79. Producers’ boycott

ACTION BY MIDDLEMEN

80. Suppliers’ and handlers’ boycott

ACTION BY OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT

81. Traders’ boycott

82. Refusal to let or sell property

83. Lockout

84. Refusal of industrial assistance

85. Merchants’ “general strike”

ACTION BY HOLDERS OF FINANCIAL RESOURCES

86. Withdrawal of bank deposits

87. Refusal to pay fees, dues, and assessments

88. Refusal to pay debts or interest

89. Severance of funds and credit

90. Revenue refusal

91. Refusal of a government’s money

ACTION BY GOVERNMENTS

92. Domestic embargo

93. Blacklisting of traders

94. International sellers’ embargo

95. International buyers’ embargo

96. International trade embargo

THE METHODS OF ECONOMIC

NONCOOOPERATION: THE STRIKE

SYMBOLIC STRIKES

97. Protest strike

98. Quickie walkout (lightning strike)

AGRICULTURAL STRIKES

99. Peasant strike

100. Farm workers’ strike

STRIKES BY SPECIAL GROUPS

101. Refusal of impressed labour

102. Prisoners’ strike

103. Craft strike

104. Professional strike

ORDINARY INDUSTRIAL STRIKES

105. Establishment strike

106. Industry strike

107. Sympathy strike

RESTRICTED STRIKES

108. Detailed strike

109. Bumper strike

110. Slowdown strike

111. Working-to-rule strike

112. Reporting “sick” (sick-in)

113. Strike by resignation

114. Limited strike

115. Selective strike

MULTI-INDUSTRY STRIKES

116. Generalised strike

117. General strike

COMBINATION OF STRIKES AND ECONOMIC CLOSURES

118. Hartal

119. Economic shutdown

THE METHODS OF POLITICAL

NONCOOPERATION

REJECTION OF AUTHORITY

120. Withholding or withdrawal of allegiance

121. Refusal of public support

122. Literature and speeches advocating resistance

CITIZENS’ NONCOOPERATION WITH GOVERNMENT

123. Boycott of legislative bodies

124. Boycott of elections

125. Boycott of government employment and positions

126. Boycott of government departments, agencies, and

other bodies

127. Withdrawal from governmental educational institutions

128. Boycott of government-supported institutions

129. Refusal of assistance to enforcement agents

130. Removal of own signs and placemarks

131. Refusal to accept appointed officials

132. Refusal to dissolve existing institutions

CITIZENS’ ALTERNATIVES TO OBEDIENCE

133. Reluctant and slow compliance

134. Nonobedience in absence of direct supervision

135. Popular nonobedience

136. Disguised disobedience

137. Refusal of an assemblage or meeting to disperse

138. Sitdown

139. Noncooperation with conscription and deportation

140. Hiding, escape, and false identities

141. Civil disobedience of “illegitimate” laws

ACTION BY GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL

142. Selective refusal of assistance by government aides

143. Blocking of lines of command and information

144. Stalling and obstruction

145. General administrative noncooperation

146. Judicial noncooperation

147. Deliberate inefficiency and selective noncooperation by

enforcement agents

148. MutinyDOMESTIC GOVERNMENTAL ACTION

149. Quasi-legal evasions and delays

150. Noncooperation by constituent governmental units

INTERNATIONAL GOVERNMENTAL ACTION

151. Changes in diplomatic and other representation

152. Delay and cancellation of diplomatic events

153. Withholding of diplomatic recognition

154. Severance of diplomatic relations

155. Withdrawal from international organisations

156. Refusal of membership in international bodies

157. Expulsion from international organisations

THE METHODS OF NONVIOLENT

INTERVENTION

PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTION

158. Self-exposure to the elements

159. The fast

a) Fast of moral pressure

b) Hunger strike

c) Satyagrahic fast

160. Reverse trial

161. Nonviolent harassment

PHYSICAL INTERVENTION

162. Sit-in

163. Stand-in

164. Ride-in

165. Wade-in

166. Mill-in

167. Pray-in

168. Nonviolent raids

169. Nonviolent air raids

170. Nonviolent invasion

171. Nonviolent interjection

172. Nonviolent obstruction

173. Nonviolent occupation

SOCIAL INTERVENTION

174. Establishing new social patterns

175. Overloading of facilities

176. Stall-in

177. Speak-in

178. Guerrilla theatre

179. Alternative social institutions

180. Alternative communication system

ECONOMIC INTERVENTION

181. Reverse strike

182. Stay-in strike

183. Nonviolent land seizure

184. Defiance of blockades

185. Politically motivated counterfeiting

186. Preclusive purchasing

187. Seizure of assets

188. Dumping

189. Selective patronage

190. Alternative markets

191. Alternative transportation systems

192. Alternative economic institutions

POLITICAL INTERVENTION

193. Overloading of administrative systems

194. Disclosing identities of secret agents

195. Seeking imprisonment

196. Civil disobedience of “neutral” laws

197. Work-on without collaboration

198. Dual sovereignty and parallel government

Shallow Water

January 14, 2013 § Leave a comment

Lagan

Goods thrown into the sea with a buoy attached so that they may be found again. Goods or materials found or left on the sea floor.

Flotsam

Floating wreckage of a ship or its cargo (in particular fragments from a shipwreck.). Also, floating debris.

Jetsam

Part of a ship, its equipment, or its cargo that is purposefully cast overboard or jettisoned to lighten the load in time of distress and that sinks or is washed ashore.

Derelict

Cargo that is also on the bottom of the ocean, but which no one has any hope of reclaiming. Forsaken, and (of ship) abandoned at sea; dilapidated, neglected.

The 1591 record – Articles concerning the admiralty of England, and the jurisdiction thereof stated:

“Any ship, yron, leade, or other goods floating or lying under the water or in the depth, of which there is no possessor or owner, which commonly are called Flotzon, Jetson, and Lagan.”

SALVAGE

What is found, rescued or reclaimed. Anything that has been put to good use that would otherwise have been wasted.

What is found

What is found

Otherwise have been wasted.

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